Space Shuttle – Single Line

A quick post this time. I have been playing about with the single lines format again and whilst doing the Space Shuttle the style sort of evolved. A little more emphasis has been put on the colours of the craft and a specific background has been added.

It is a little rough around the edges and this style could do with some refinement but as a concept I think it works quite well and will sit nicely alongside the others.

Print

Space Shuttle – Single Line

Enjoying a Craft Part IV – Soap

As I mentioned in the first part of this post series, it doesn’t matter what the object is, if there is a video of it being made then I’ll watch it. For many of these videos the people who are behind the craft have a story to tell. They have become so involved with what they do, and inherently love what they do that when they talk about it, you can sense the passion and drive they have.

This weeks video looks at a maker of handmade soap in San Francisco. Whilst the visuals depict the process of the soap being cast, cut and stamped, the narrative tells a story. One of perseverance and striving to make things the best you can.

The backstory is also interesting. Not discussed in the video, the soap maker, Kim Rollo Emanuel used to work in Silicon Valley as an electronic engineer. His wife then developed a hypersensitivity to the synthetic ingredients found in conventional skincare products. So he started on a quest to create what resulted in being completely organic. As a result of his endeavours, his business has expanded and he is selling his products all over the world.

This is proof, I suppose, that one day you will find your true calling in life and that ultimately, you will be happier doing something you truly enjoy.

Enjoy!

Enjoying a Craft Part IV – Soap

Sydney Opera House and a Single Line

In 2013 when I started to do images using a single line, they were only cars. Cars are a big area of interest for me and I’m sure they always will be. However, I have constantly looked at other areas to go into to try and broaden their appeal but also to see how well other things look drawn with a single line.

One area of which I have discussed and posted is architecture. Having already completed and made a post about a single line created for the Forth Rail Bridge and the Eiffel Tower I started to look at other structures I could create. This got me thinking and I came up with something that would focus my mind. For as long as I can remember, I have had a list of places I would like to visit (for reference, I have lots of lists. In fact a man can never have too many lists). What I decided to do was to create a single line artwork of these places. Of the two previous, I have been to and over the Forth Rail Bridge multiple times but I am yet to to Paris and the Eiffel Tower. Soon though.

One of the places that has always been at the very top of this list is Australia and what is one of the most iconic and recognisable buildings in Australia? The Sydney Opera House. It has a unique shape that means it is perfect for recreating as a single line.

As a little bit of background on the building it was designed by Danish architect Jørn Utzon in the 1950’s and was completed in 1973 instantly becoming a landmark. In 2007, it became a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Overall, it turned out quite well. I just need to get cracking on with the rest of my list now which includes a single line of a hamster… I wonder how well that one will turn out.

Print

Sydney Opera House and a Single Line

Enjoying a Craft – Part III

Letterpress printing. A method of printing that has been around for hundreds of years. Its usage began to decline in the late 20th century thanks to the adoption of computers in the printing industry.

However there are some places that continue on the art of hand-set type. This weeks video shows part of the process that makes up letterpress printing.

Enjoy!

Enjoying a Craft – Part III

IKEA on the Mind

I like IKEA. I don’t even try to hide that I do. It might be something to do with the fact I drive a Volvo and/or my flat has more than its fair share of IKEA furnishings.

If you like IKEA as much as me and you can’t get enough of putting together flat pack furniture in your spare time then look no further. I went on the internet and somehow found an IKEA inspired flat pack furniture assembly game! Yes, it really does exist.

Called Höme Improvisåtion the aim is to assemble various pieces of furniture without using any instructions. It is a multiplayer game if you want it to be. It is annoyingly good fun however the controls are not quite that easy or intuitive to use. In reality though, it is the perfect way to spend five minutes if you have a bit of time to waste.

The most interesting thing about this game which makes up for the small gripe about the controls is that it was made in just 48 hours. Quite impressive.

If you would like to find out more about this game or even have a shot of it yourself, please click on the link below:

http://thestorkburntdown.itch.io/home-improv

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IKEA on the Mind

Enjoying a Craft – Part II

Two weeks ago the video I posted was relating to axe making and creating a bespoke piece. This week the video is at the different end of the quantity scale. Scissors.

Let me explain. The story behind this video is an interesting one. Ernest Wright & Son Ltd are based in Sheffield and manufacture scissors. Established in 1902 they grew to become the largest scissor manufacturer in the UK by the 1970’s. But from then on, mass manufacture and cheaper products from elsewhere in the world saw a decline in their business. They still make scissors but focus on traditionally crafted, high quality products.

2014 saw the company almost admit defeat but thanks to a well timed video you are about to see, made by Shaun Bloodworth, orders made an upward turn. There was an article on the BBC website with a different video about the declining art.

However, the video below only focuses on the making of the scissors.

Enjoy!

Video

Monument Valley

Playing games on my iPhone is not really something that I do that often. If I had the choice of playing something on either my phone or my PS3, the latter would win every time. However, the convenience of the phone when out and about does mean that if there is a spare minute or two to be had, it can easily be filled (providing there is not anything else that needs done).

There are three reasons why I don’t particularly like playing games on my phone. The first is the screen size. For anything worthwhile playing often, trying to play it on a small screen gets tiring after a while. The second reason is that your fingers get in the way of the screen. This cannot be changed as the main input on a touchscreen phone is your finger. The third and final reason is that the majority of applications created are only after your money and thus decisions within them and the design of them is often an afterthought.

Due to the reasons mentioned above there are only two games on my phone currently. That is quite high praise considering I don’t really keep anything on my phone with games and other applications often being deleted when I find I no longer use them. The first game is one that I wrote about on here in 2010 and it has kept its position throughout and on 3 different phones. Colorbind. A delightfully simple yet addictive game where you need to fold paper strips to cover dots. It is a game that you can tell has been designed well with a nice simple idea that can keep you occupied for hours.

The second game is one that I have only recently downloaded. The design stakes have certainly been raised and in the short time I have had it, this game is one of the best designed, most playable and wonderfully quirky games that I have ever played.

Monument Valley.

The idea behind the game is relatively simple. In each level, you need to guide the main character, called Ida, through a geometric optical illusion. All the levels have elements of optical illusions, impossible objects, explorations of infinity, tessellations and architecture very reminiscent of work done by M. C. Escher, the Dutch Graphic Designer.

Each level is a work of art and when you get further into it either by advancing or even just spinning various objects around, more and more detail is revealed. To top it off, the soundtrack is wonderfully calming too and reminds me of a game on my iPad called Osmos.

The only downside to the game is that there are only 10 levels and if you are good at puzzles it won’t take you long at all. I downloaded the game on Friday morning and by Friday evening I had finished it. I would have been quicker but I was at work! It almost makes the £2.99 price tag seem a little steep, but with the amount of time that has clearly been put into it, the fact you don’t need to buy anything to get further in the game and the sheer replayability of it does make up for that. I should point out that an expansion pack has been made available with a further 8 levels, I am yet to buy that but the base game on its own is enough to keep me occupied for just now.

Monument Valley reportedly took 55 weeks to develop and cost $852,000 to do so. These numbers may seem large for such a small application, but it just goes to show that quality isn’t something that comes quickly or cheaply.

If you like puzzle type games that are well designed and have massive replay value I would strongly recommend this.

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Google Play Android App

Amazon Kindle Fire Apps

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Monument Valley